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Serpa Solar Park built in Portugal in 2006. Source: Wikipedia.org

  • Lithium-ion batteries have a high energy density — which means you can pack a large charge in a relatively small package. Again, that makes them great for mobile computing and transportation.
  • Lithium-ion batteries tend to be quick charging. This again makes them good for mobile devices as the mobile devices need not be connected to a plug for that many minutes in a day.
  • They tend to be persnickety — their discharge and recharge cycles must be carefully managed, they lose charging capacity over time, and their functional lives tend to be short (3,000 recharge cycles at most), even when you baby them.
  • The price has come down considerably over the last 10 years, but they are still expensive — running between $300-$1,000 per kilowatt hour (for grid storage and home storage devices, respectively).
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Team EnerVenue — solving the issues of grid storage in the age of COVID-19. Source: Enervenue.com

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Professor Yi Cui, Stanford University. Source: EnerVenue.com

  • Have a 30+ year lifespan, and are capable of 30,000+ full recharge cycles without performance degradation or usage restrictions.
  • Use Low-cost, non-toxic, and easy-to-recycle components.
  • Require no operational and maintenance expenditures.
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EnerVenue’s Metal-Hydrogen batteries. These batteries solve a lot of the problems that have slowed down implementation of grid-scale storage until now. Source: EnerVenue.com

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Doug Kimmelman, famed utility and power systems investor, is one of EnerVenue’s early supporters. Source: Doug Kimmelman

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Jorg Heinemann, CEO of EnerVenue, has spent the last 10 years as an executive in the renewable energy and battery storage world. Source: EnerVenue.com